Director BIO: Frank Prinzi (IT’S A MESS)

083a72b4ef headshot

Frank Prinzi ASC, is an Award winning filmmaker, who has been an active member of the New York Filmmaking Community for many years. He earned his Master Of Fine Arts degree in Film and Television from New York University, working early on with Spike Lee, Jim Jarmusch, Ang Lee, Tom Dicillo, John Woo and Ed Burns among others. His eclectic cinematography credits range from feature films, television movies to episodic series, documentaries and commercials. Writing and directing “It’s a Mess” was a chance for him to make his own personal statement and to take more creative control as a storyteller.

 

Director Statement

 

IT’S A MESS is a fantasy but its themes are all too real: lonely, damaged, and defeated people, searching for any morsel of compassion and meaning. Finding purpose is rarely easy. If we’re lucky, we find someone to help open our eyes to it. A friendship, no matter how strange or unlikely, is still a treasured oasis for a lonely soul.
We’re all troubled by the state of our world: the glorification of greed and selfishness and the loneliness and alienation that result. Anyone who observes the world can see that it’s a mess… but it’s our mess, tragic and beautiful – something we all need to face in order to survive and change.

The technique in IT’S A MESS mirrors the story: dark, still, and quiet, with camera movement kept to a minimum. These choices seemed the ideal approach to reveal the themes of this strange little tale. IT’S A MESS is simple and classic in it’s style. No need for fireworks and overindulgent technique, just pure Cinema. The goal was to get to the heart and soul of the story with focus on the character performances and atmosphere, keeping it clear from lots of todays excessive visual and aural distractions. As Robert Bresson said,”Empty the pond to get to the fish”. I really hope you like our Film.

“There is some soul of goodness in things evil,
Would men knowing distill it out” -Henry V, Shakespeare

Advertisements

Director BIO: Sophie Black (SONGBIRD)

2860b62135 headshot

Sophie graduated from the University of Creative Arts in 2010, then spent the next few years working in the art department of independent productions.

She produced subtle sci-fi Stop/Eject (which screened at Raindance 2014, before making it onto the long list for Best British Short at BAFTA), and directed Night Owls, (which screened at London Short Film Festival in 2016 and won 17 awards at smaller festivals), as well as building a career as a producer and editor of corporate films. She was recently selected as a participant of the 2018 BAFTA crew.

Short Film: SONGBIRD, 14min., UK, Fantasy

041da29286 poster

Shy singer Jennifer thinks her dreams are coming true when a music producer approaches her at an open mic night. But her hopes are dashed after an encounter with a mysterious old woman leaves Jennifer without a voice.

After some research, Jennifer discovers the presence of magic in the world, and sets off on a journey to retrieve her stolen voice from a foreboding place known as ‘Blackmoor Woods’. Can Jennifer find her courage as well as her voice before her future is taken from her forever?

News & Reviews

Short Film: LIFE OR DEATH DEBATES, 6min., USA, Sci-Fi

38f4509c29 poster

The future’s greatest gameshow: two convicts, 120 seconds, and one chance to debate for their lives – all on live television. Tune into this weeks episode, and prepare for a wild ride. Today’s debate topic will have you reeling.

Project Links

Director BIO: Valentin Petit (THE NOISE OF THE LIGHT)

Bc43f6865a headshot

Valentin Petit is a young French director based in Paris. He wrote several video clips for street music artists and directed a lot of commercials for famous brands such as Puma, Unicef, Adidas or Canal +. His passion for travel naturally led him to fiction, through which he was able to express a more neo-melancholic creation. He is currently developing many personal projects, among which short films that won multiple awards in French and international film festivals, like his latest experimental film: « A Portrait of Rafel Delalande ».

 

Director Statement

 

Following my previous works (Anthophobia and A Portrait of Rafel Delalande), I wanted Le Bruit de la Lumière as a crossroad between a visual experience and a film fantastic. Through this combination, I wanted to tell a story about the synaesthesia phenomenon. I discovered this feeling which some people experience in the autobiographic novel from Daniel Tammet, Born On A Blue Day.

In order to create Lou, the main character, with Guillaume (co-writer), we went a little bit further by giving her a supernatural ability to generate sound when she is touch by the light. This choice show our fascination and our inability to understand something which is so intimate and personal.

The Fantastic treatment of the story is also a way to exacerbate the connections between our main characters. Marius and Pablo are facing an opportunity which is difficult to avoid, despite their friendship with Lou. How would we react in front of such a phenomenon? Moreover, how are we actually reacting to a person who describes her synaesthesia?

Short Film: THE NOISE OF THE LIGHT, 23min., Paris, Sci-Fi

F28d0df684 poster

Pablo and Marius make a disturbing discovery about their childhood friend Lou: she appears to be able to synthesise into sound the light she is exposed to. But as she soon becomes an instrument of their musical experiences, her gift turns into a sort of curse…

News & Reviews